Autism

Our lab’s strongest clinical focus is on sensory processing in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD). Individuals with ASD often report atypical sensory perception, usually in the form of hyper- or hypo-sensitivity. We are currently exploring how sensory processing differences in ASD may impact the daily lives of individuals with ASD, from social communication to cognition.

One aspect we are particularly interested in, as with the overall focus of the lab, is the ability to integrate, or perceptually bind, sensory information. In many ways, individuals with ASD show intact or even enhanced sensory processing abilities, particularly when focusing on the components, or details of a visual scene, for example. In other cases, such as the ability to integrate what is seen and heard, individuals with ASD may have difficulties. Our current research investigates:

  1. What is the underlying nature of the differences in sensory processing observed in ASD?
  2. What areas show sensory difficulties, and likewise, what processes show sensory enhancements?
  3. Most importantly, how do sensory processing differences impact social communication, repetitive behaviours, and cognition in ASD populations?

Our lab also looks at how we can harness individuals perceptual learning abilities to improve upon areas of sensory processing difficulty in individuals with ASD. Specifically, we test volunteers on a number of tasks before and after a perceptual learning paradigm, which allows us to measure both the perceptual, behavioural, and neural impacts of the training paradigm. Our end goal is to create novel remediation strategies that will have the ability to not only improve sensory processing in individuals with ASD, but to also improve the higher-level processes that rely on sensory processing, such as social communication, in children and adults with ASD.

For media reports on this line of work, see our In the Media page, and for peer-reviewed work, see:

Stevenson, R. A., Segers, M., Ferber, S., Barense, M.D., & Wallace, M.T. (In Press). Keeping time in the brain: Autism spectrum disorder and audiovisual temporal processingAutism Research, DOI: 10.1002/aur.1566.

Baum, S. H., Stevenson, R. A., & Wallace, M. T. (In Press). Connecting sights and sounds: Examining sensory function and multisensory integration in autism.  Progress in Neurobiology, DOI: 10.1016/j.pneurobio.2015.09.007.

Baum, S., Stevenson, R. A., & Wallace, M. T. (2015). Testing sensory and multisensory function in children with autism spectrum disorder. Journal of Visualized Experiments, 98, e53677.

Stevenson, R. A.,  Siemann, J. K., Woynaroski, T. G., Schneider, B. C., Eberly, H. E., Camarata, S. M., & Wallace, M. T. (2014). Multisensory temporal integration in autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Neurocience, 34(3), 691-697.

Stevenson, R. A., Segers, M., Ferber, S., Barense, M.D., & Wallace, M.T. (2014). The impact of multisensory integration deficits on speech perception in children with autism spectrum disorders. Frontiers in Psychology, 5(379), 1-4.

Stevenson, R. A., Siemann, J. K, Schneider, B. C., Eberly, H. E., Woynaroski, T. G., Camarata, S. M., & Wallace, M. T. (2014). Arrested development of audiovisual speech perception in autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 44(6), 1470-1477.

Stevenson, R. A., Siemann, J. K, Schneider, B. C., Eberly, H. E., Woynaroski, T. G., Camarata, S. M., & Wallace, M. T. (2014). Evidence for diminished multisensory integration in autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disabilities, 44(12), 3161-3167.

Wallace, M. T. & Stevenson, R. A. (2014). The construct of the multisensory temporal binding window and its dysregulation in developmental disabilities. Neuropsychologia, 64, 105-123.

Woynaroski, T. G., Kwayke, L., Foss-Feig, J. H., Stevenson, R. A., Stone, W. L., & Wallace, M. T. (2013). Multisensory speech perception in high-functioning children with autism spectrum disorders. Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, 43(12), 2897-2902.

Stevenson, R. A. (2012). Using functional connectivity analysis to investigate the bases of autism spectrum disorders and other clinical populations. Journal of Neuroscience, 32(50): 17933-17934.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s